National testing standards launched for pedestrian trucks

May 13, 2019 by Kirsty Adams
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National testing standards launched for pedestrian trucks

The Accrediting Bodies Association for Workplace Transport (ABA) has announced new national standards for the testing of powered pedestrian truck operators.

The ABA developed the new standards following its October 2018 summit in Coventry. The meeting was attended by a large number of representatives from industry organisations, such as the Health & Safety Executive (HSE), truck manufacturers, lift truck operator employers, trade unions and industry bodies (including the Fork Lift Truck Association).

After the completion of trials, the new standards will be released in June 2019 and take full effect in December 2019. 


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Founded by four accrediting bodies in 2012 — AITT, ITSSAR, NPORS and RTITB — the ABA was created to ensure that bodies offering accreditation to the workplace transport industry were meeting a national code of conduct. The ABA also makes sure that consistent operator testing standards are used and works to help the HSE reduce lift truck accident numbers. 

Those involved in the training, testing and management of pedestrian truck operators will be able to download the new national testing standards for free from the ABA website, as part of the ABA’s commitment to improving safety in the material handling equipment industry.

Announcing the new standards, recently elected ABA Chairman Adam Smith — who is the current Managing Director of accrediting body AITT — said: “This is a very significant development in an area of training that is often overlooked by employers. The new standards will help ensure operators work efficiently and safely.” 

The ABA meet approximately every three months to discuss operator testing standards for the transport training industry, and members will be working to arrange the next industry summit, due to take place in October 2019. 

“We strive to keep all testing standards up to date with modern environments,” said Adam. “These latest updates reflect changing work practices and address new requirements.”

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