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Amazon to create more UK jobs

Amazon to create more UK jobs

Amazon has announced that it created 10,000 new jobs at the company across Europe in 2015 and that it plans to create several thousand more new jobs in Europe in 2016. The BBC reports that the company will take on 2,500 new permanent staff in the UK this year, bringing its total number of UK employees to 14,000.

Amazon currently employs over 40,000 people across Europe. The 10,000 new permanent roles added in 2015 is the most Amazon has created in a single year in Europe and a 50% increase over 2014. In 2016, the company is investing to expand its European Fulfilment Network, increase EU-based research and development, and build new infrastructure to support its growing cloud-computing business, among other initiatives.

“We are seeing stronger demand than ever from our customers all across Europe, and we see lots more opportunity across Amazon’s businesses to invent and invest for the future,” said Xavier Garambois, Vice President, Amazon EU Retail. "We created over 10,000 new jobs in 2015 and plan to create several thousand more in 2016 at all education, experience and skill levels, from speech and linguistic scientists to digital media experts to fulfilment centre and customer service associates."

Amazon has invested over €15bn since 2010 on infrastructure and operations in Europe. The company operates a pan EU business with over 80 corporate offices, fulfilment centres, seller and customer service centres, R&D centres, and Amazon Web Services (AWS) datacenter regions.

The company recently announced new investments in London for a new UK head office and a new datacenter region for AWS customers. The UK datacenter region is in addition to the existing AWS datacenter regions in Frankfurt and in Dublin.

Amazon is hiring more computer scientists and software development engineers (SDEs) across its European network of 12 research and development centres. Centres in Germany, Ireland, The Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Spain, and the UK are inventing in areas across the company, including the Amazon retail website and mobile apps, digital media, devices and device software such as voice recognition technology, Prime Air, and cloud services.

Careers with Amazon in Europe provide opportunities for people with all types of experience, education and skill levels. Many roles require advanced degrees and proficiency in multiple languages while others require no experience and instead offer on-the-job and life skill training. Amazon is also helping employees build skills for new careers within and outside of Amazon.

To date, over 1,000 Amazon employees in Europe have participated in Career Choice, Amazon’s innovative adult education program that pre-pays 95% of tuition and associated fees for permanent employees to undertake nationally recognised courses for up to four years. Employees participating in Career Choice can choose from a variety of high-wage, in-demand occupations such as aircraft mechanics, computer-aided design, machine tool technologies, medical lab technologies, nursing, and many other fields.

“We are proud to offer great jobs for people who already have the skills we’re looking for and to help develop people who want to add new skills through our innovative programs like Career Choice,” said Roy Perticucci, Vice President, Amazon EU Operations. “We’re planning to add thousands of new jobs in all areas across our European Fulfilment Network in 2016 as we ramp up to meet increased demand from customers and invent in new areas.”

Amazon says all of its permanent and temporary positions offer competitive salaries and wages with great benefits.

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